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ac777

Best reel for pike Spinning or BaitCaster?

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Hey Guys, heading up to Alaska at the end of the month. We are going to be doing some pike fishing, and most likely some trout fishing as well. I would like to know the pros and cons of Baitcasters. I have been using spinning reels and haven't used a bait caster. Would it be worth it? How hard are they to learn. I will be doing about half casting and half trolling with it most likely. Also what would be the best baitcaster for the money. I'm on a budget and would like to not spend much more than $50 on a reel if possible. Thanks a lot.

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If you have a spinning reel that has sufficient capacity for the lb test line that you want to want to use and you feel comfortable with using it, you can just take that. But for what it is worth, every angler I know who chases big pike/muskies/trout uses a casting reel.

Casting reels:

Pros: More line capacity, more compact, lighter than spinning reel of the same line capacity. Also eliminates line twisting from larger fish pulling out line.

Cons: Need to learn to cast without causing backlash. Can't think of any other downsides unless you break the worm gear, which doesn't happen very often.

Unless you already have one, you will need to buy a different rod as well as a reel. To get a reel in that price range, I would look on the E-(online auction site) for a newer Ambassadeur reel like a 6000, 6500, or 6600. There will be older 6000's on there for significantly less but they have the small handles which are slower for retrieving and harder to crank if you have a good sized fish on. Also always check to see if the seller charges a fixed fee for shipping and handling as some of those sellers like to hit you for $10-$15 to send something that costs them $5.

You can get a good rod from Gander or Cabelas from $30 and up.

Steve

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Thanks for the info deadsea, How hard is it to learn to cast with a spinning reel? There is a rod at Gander that I liked. Just gotta figure out the reel. Any other input?

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It won't take that long. You will need to adjust the tension knobs on the side of the reel so when you press the bail button, the weight of the lure slowly pulls out line. This will reduce your chance of backlash. If you can't get out on the lake before you go, practice with one of those kids rubber practice plugs or take the hooks off of one of your lures and practice in your yard.

Just make sure you get a reel with enough capacity like one of the models I mentioned. Some of the more "streamlined" reels look cool but they don't hold much line.

Steve

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ac777,

(man would I love to fish Alaska again)

If you're looking to travel light, and if you're looking for one rig to handle both trout and pike, spinning is the way to go.

Admittedly, a casting rig is the better long term solution should you continue to pursue pike, but superlines have changed the spinning landscape a bit. Unless you're targeting very large trout with large lures, casting rigs may be a bit heavy for trout. Also, it will be very tough to find a decent casting reel in the fifty dollar range.

A 7ft, M to MH rod that handles lures in the 1/4 to 3/4oz. range, and a spinning reel spooled with any 15lb braid can handle a wide range of lures that work well for both species. This rig will ably handle all but very large pike and/or pike lures.

This same rig, with 8 or 10lb mono on a spare spool, will handle even lighter lures if you're downsizing for smaller trout in smaller environments.

There are lots of great sales on now, and you could upgrade, or add another quality spinning reel for right around fifty bucks.

Casting is not really a difficult skill to learn, but spinning, as you know, is virtually fool proof.

IMHO, I'd focus on spinning for this this trip, and save my dollars for for a better casting reel down the road.

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Chief, Thanks, I think I will stick with spinning then. I can cast pretty well with them and it would probably be a bit more universal. I am excited to go up to AK again. This time My Bro will be toting along with me, it should be a great trip for him and I both. Will try to post up some pics afterwards.

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For most people I'd say stick with spinning if you're not sure, you can easily stick with spinning and cast decent-sized lures and fight huge strong fish. There are heavier spinning reels and rods out there to be bought.

That said, I picked up my first personal baitcasting rod/reel this year specifically for pike fishing in canada, half on intrigue and half on simply wanting to get into using baitcasters more often.

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