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Scott M

How big is fishing in Minnesota?

12 posts in this topic

From the DNR News:

Just how big is fishing in Minnesota? Big enough that it contributes $4.7 billion to the state’s economy every year and attracts 1.4 million licensed anglers to Minnesota’s 11,842 lakes.

Let’s fillet those numbers into more digestible morsels:

* If every licensed angler ventured out at the same time, each of Minnesota’s 11,842 lakes would have to accommodate 118 anglers.

* One out of every five Minnesotans fish, meaning that 1.1 million of Minnesota’s 5.2 million residents pick up a fishing pole at least once during the year … and that’s not counting youth.

* Minnesota ranks fourth among states with the highest number of anglers. The top three states are Florida, Texas and California. Wisconsin is fifth, according to the National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation conducted by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

* As a percentage of population among those states, Minnesota boasts the largest number of resident anglers at 28 percent and is tied nationally with Alaska for the largest participation of resident anglers.

* Anglers spend $2.8 billion on fishing each year in Minnesota, according to the American Sportfishing Association’s (ASA) Sportfishing in America survey.

* Dollars directly spent on fishing in Minnesota create an additional $1.9 billion in economic activity, boosting angling’s total statewide economic impact to $4.7 billion, according to the ASA’s Sportfishing in America survey.

* Equipment (rods, reels, line, boats, trailers, etc.) accounted for $1.2 billion of the $2.8 billion spent. Trip-related expenses accounted for $860 million. Other expenses such as bait and equipment rental accounted for $646 million, according to the National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation conducted by USFWS.

* Salaries, wages and business earnings directly related to fishing in Minnesota total $1.3 billion, according to the ASA’s Sportfishing in America survey.

* Fishing creates Minnesota 43,812 jobs, according to the ASA’ s Sportfishing in America survey.

* Minnesota angling generates $350 million in federal tax revenues and $342 million in state and local tax revenues, according to the ASA’s Sportfishing in America survey.

* In 2008, Minnesota fishing license sales generated $19 million in revenue.

Just who are these anglers and where are they from:

* Most resident anglers - 755,000 of them in fact - are from the seven-county metropolitan area. The remaining 388,000 resident anglers live outside the Twin Cities, according to the National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation conducted by USFWS.

* Men account for 69 percent of resident anglers. Women account for 31 percent, according to the National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation conducted by USFWS.

* The highest percentage of participation comes in the 35-44 year old age group. Most of the remaining participants come from the 45-64 year old age group, with those 16-24 years old accounting for only 12 percent of the people who fish, according to the National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation conducted by USFWS.

* An estimated 40 percent of Minnesota anglers have household incomes of $50,000-$100,000. Households that make less than $50,000 annually account for 27 percent of Minnesota anglers, according to the National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation conducted by USFWS .

* An estimated 388,000 children ages 6-15 go fishing each year, with Twin Cities-area youth accounting for 76 percent of the total. More girls (52 percent) went fishing than boys (48 percent). Participation among age groups (6-8 years, 9-11 years and 12-15 years) remained fairly constant, according to the National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation conducted by USFWS.

Finally, here’s a look at where these resident anglers go and what they’re trying to hook:

* Significantly more time is spent fishing on lakes rather than rivers and streams, according to the National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation conducted by USFWS.

* The average Minnesota angler spends 20 days fishing each year, with 86 percent of resident anglers never fishing anywhere else but Minnesota, according to the National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation conducted by USFWS.

* Only 3 percent of Minnesota anglers try their luck on Lake Superior, according to the National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation conducted by USFWS.

* The most sought-after fish species, in order of preference, are walleye, bluegill, northern pike, crappie and bass, according to the National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation conducted by USFWS.

* Most resident anglers spend nearly half their time fishing for walleye and bluegill, according to the National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation conducted by USFWS.

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nice find really interesting to see how fishing fuels the state, do you have any info on hunting???

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Good Stuff da_chise31 and sweet avatar!

I guess the sky isn't falling as far as Minnesota Fishing goes! smile

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I did a speech in college last semester on ice fishing and used these facts as part of it. Yes, I got an A.

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Fishing rocks! Just goes to show how important our sport is to the economy!!!

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"16-24 year olds account for only 12 percent of the fishing licenses." I think the DNR has shown major concern for this factor. It appears fishing is getting less popular among young people, which could spell disaster for the future. I try to introduce one new young person to fishing each year. I am 22 years old and I have no trouble finding new fisherpeople who really want to experience the sport, but have no means to. These people are just waiting for people like to us say, "Do you want to come fishing?" Give this some thought and I think you will realize that introducing young people to fishing is just as important to the future of MN fishing than catch and release.

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that's the next battle the DNR is fighting - getting people outside. Not even fishing, but hunting, boating, hiking, etc. Youth especially are becoming slaves to technology, why go outside when you can play videogames?

On one hand I'm excited that there may be less pressure in the coming years, but we really need to get youth off the couch and outside!

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that's the next battle the DNR is fighting - getting people outside. Not even fishing, but hunting, boating, hiking, etc. Youth especially are becoming slaves to technology, why go outside when you can play videogames?

On one hand I'm excited that there may be less pressure in the coming years, but we really need to get youth off the couch and outside!

Have you TRIED rapala fishing on the wii??? Who wants to ACTUALLY cast 10,000 times for a musky when you could catch 10 or more in an hour in your own living room??? :P

Just kidding. Fishing isn't going to die out, there is no replacement for how fun it is.

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"16-24 year olds account for only 12 percent of the fishing licenses." I think the DNR has shown major concern for this factor. It appears fishing is getting less popular among young people, which could spell disaster for the future. I try to introduce one new young person to fishing each year. I am 22 years old and I have no trouble finding new fisherpeople who really want to experience the sport, but have no means to. These people are just waiting for people like to us say, "Do you want to come fishing?" Give this some thought and I think you will realize that introducing young people to fishing is just as important to the future of MN fishing than catch and release.

maybe DNR needs to have multiple "Take a Kid Fishing" weekends/days... or even maybe one weekend a year where people can fish without a license.. maybe then it would introduce more people to fishing

on the other hand i think a lot of people these days are intimidated by fishing.. so many different rods/reels to choose from.. lines.. lures.. terminal tackle.. these people have no idea where to start or with what to start with..

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Great Actical Scott. Awesome things to knwo!

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