Guests - If You want access to member only forums on HSO. You will gain access only when you sign-in or Sign-Up on HotSpotOutdoors.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
grizkid

abu garcia

9 posts in this topic

just wondering if anyone knows how many inches per crank on a 7000ihsn or were you can find this info for abu reels

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A call to ABU customer service will get you the "official" answer. However, it's nearly impossible, or almost meaningless, to describe reel performance via "inches per crank". Retrieve rate specifics will be greatly affected by spool diameter/circumference. More line on a spool equals greater spool diameter, which equals more inches retrieved per spool revolution. Smaller spool diameter equals a lower rate of retrieve. Your "inches per crank" rates are always smallest at the start of your retrieve, and always largest toward the end. Likewise, the amount of line you're retrieving is always changing. IMHO: Put as much line on your ABU as your comfort zone allows, and pay more attention to gear ratios than "inches per crank".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree completely with Chief. Gear ratio is what you are looking for not a variable stat. Ever since people started using Trinidads, which advertise 48 inches per crank, that seems to be the info people are looking for. However, it is still incredibly variable. But if you want a more definitive answer, we tried to measure it last year to compare to a Trinidad TN 12. A full 7000i Pro Rocket. Both were spooled with White 100# Tuf-line Plus. The Abu picked up about 32 inches per crank - If I remember correctly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's relative to how full the spool is and at what point in the retrieve you're at.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thanks for the info guys was just curios as i use this reel for dcgs and was wondering how it comparede to a saltist 50, tinidad is uncomfortable for me was just seeing if it was reely worth getting a saltist but i think i'll use this till it blows.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thanks for the info guys was just curios as i use this reel for dcgs and was wondering how it comparede to a saltist 50, tinidad is uncomfortable for me was just seeing if it was reely worth getting a saltist but i think i'll use this till it blows.

Saltist 50? Their 40 model does 48 inches per crank at full capacity, 30 and 20 do less and are physically smaller than the 40 or a 7000.

And which trinidad is uncomfortable? There are at least 3 model's/sizes all with different line pickup rates. The 16N is the big one, about the same size as a saltist 40 or a 7000, might be a tad larger.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

jred sry bout the 50 had the revo stuck in my head comparing to the saltist 30 i tried the 16n last year and didn't like it it just felt akward might not have been all the real was on a freinds rod which is a 8' okuma the handle seems to be thicker on this as well I already have a 7000 was given to me and its not exceptionally comfortable either but i make do it was free.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Saltist 30TH (tall/Narrow)is the most like the Trinidad for burning. I feel it helps to have a longer rod with the high speed...minimum 8'6" otherwise I feel like I'm fighting the rod and tougher to keep the lure in the water, figure 8's etc.

Saltist

Model

Number Action

FW/SW Bearings Gear

Ratio Line Per

Handle Turn Wt.

(oz.) Line Capacity

(Lb. Test/Yards) Drag

Max

Ultra High Speed

STT20H -/L 2CRBB, 2BB, 1RB 6.1 : 1 36.0" 0 12/420, 14/350, 20/210 15.4

STT30H -/ML 2CRBB, 2BB, 1RB 6.1 : 1 36.0" 0 14/490, 20/295, 25/230 15.4

STT30TH -/ML 2 CRBB, 2 BB, 1 RB 6.4 : 1 47.2" 23.20 20/300, 25/240, 30/200 20.0

STT40H -/M 2 CRBB, 2 BB, 1 RB 6.4 : 1 47.2" 24.30 25/400, 30/270, 40/240 20.0

STT50H -/MH 2 CRBB, 2 BB, 1 RB 6.4 : 1 47.2" 25.00 30/350, 40/310, 50/220 20.0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Posts

    • I'm awesome at catching fish in the US. I leave Canada to those who are not so awesome at fishing.
    • I was at the fishing show & had talked with the Aqua Vu staff.  Their new HD cameras look amazing!  I thought the pictures on the AV760 was great, but these are super sharp. They also stated that you can view them clearly in the direct sun light.
    • The walleyes (current strong) I catch on Rainy fight harder than any bass I've ever caught. 
    • That's what happened when a mouse ran up Del's leg. He peed all over the carpet. 
    • cool info here....   http://files.dnr.state.mn.us/education_safety/safety/ice/ice_stats.pdf
    • Anyone fall thru the ice with a floating jacket or bibs? Any take on it? How about going thru WITHOUT floating jacket and pants? Any take on it? What if you fall in? What should you do if you fall through the ice? First, try not to panic. This may be easier said than done, unless you have worked out a survival plan in advance. Read through these steps so that you can be prepared. Don't remove your winter clothing. Heavy clothes won't drag you down, but instead can trap air to provide warmth and flotation. This is especially true with a snowmobile suit. Turn toward the direction you came. That’s probably the strongest ice. Place your hands and arms on the unbroken surface. This is where a pair of nails, sharpened screwdrivers or ice picks come in handy in
      providing the extra traction you need to pull yourself up onto the ice. Kick your feet and dig in your ice picks to work your way back onto the solid ice. If your clothes have trapped a lot of water, you may have to lift yourself partially out of the water on your elbows to let the water drain before starting forward. Lie flat on the ice once you are out and roll away from the hole to keep your weight spread out. This may help prevent you from breaking through again. Get to a warm, dry, sheltered area and re-warm yourself immediately. In moderate to severe cases of cold water hypothermia, you must seek medical attention. Cold blood trapped in your extremities can come rushing back to your heart after you begin to re-warm. The shock of the
      chilled blood may cause ventricular fibrillation leading to a heart attack and death! 
    • dont be surprised if ya catch a REB!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    • Well see their ya, go. Now fight that on a 26" rod. Can we both agree then that Walleye's can give up a little fight?
    • Here's a 12lber from this summer, though    
  • Our Sponsors