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popriveter

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About popriveter

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    Sr HotSpotOutdoors.com Family
  • Birthday 09/24/1976

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  • Location:
    St Paul, MN
  1. My way of helping is keeping smaller fish. I don't keep fewer fish, I just treat small fish as eaters and large fish as breeders. When I catch big fish, they'll be handled carefully, released gently and are free to make babies. Babies with the genes to grow large. I rarely keep a large fish that wasn't injured (gill hooked, bleeding badly, etc). I eat sunfish 8" and smaller, crappies 9" and smaller, bass 14" and smaller (in summer, they all go back) and have tuned my y-bone removal abilities to get meat off little pike. I've also figured out ways to make good meals of underappreciated fish. In 2016, I made meals of smoked carp, redhorse, and even smelt-fried creek chubs and shiners. Makes me sick when I see fishermen wreck a population size structure, but I can't say I blame any one of the people who contribute to the problem. I've been guilty of contributing to this myself. We've been conditioned backward by minimum-size regulations- learning to view larger fish as food when that approach results in a population of smaller peak-sized and average-sized fish. So my "sacrifice" is the time and convenience of filleting fewer, larger fish. I instead take the time to fillet more, smaller fish and send the big guys back out there to reproduce. Then, one of my fellow fishermen probably catches and kills that big fish. No one person can solve this problem. It requires a cultural change which probably also requires regulations to change. I'm going to keep doing my part conscientiously and will keep respecting my fellow fishermen who abide by the laws. Even when they apply different standards than I do. My kids are used to hearing, "That fish is too big to keep!"
  2. Geez, y'all have a different understanding of "affordable" than I do. I use a Shimano Cardiff. About $100 new. Parts (even upgrade parts) are easy to come by. It is durable and fishes great. If you plan to fish long days, several times a week, it probably makes sense to throw an extra $100-$200 into a lighter/faster/bulletproofer reel. But if you're just looking for a solid reel that won't disappoint a recreational musky fisherman, a Cardiff is a good choice. Buy one used and put the $40 you save toward good line and leaders. ...and don't feel guilty if you outfish the guy with the $300 revo. just my 2 cents
  3. They are active now. Comparing the bellies I saw last night to those I saw last week, I'd say they are just post spawn where I'm catching them.
  4. 29" brown from Chequamegon bay. My new PB.
  5. Briefly visited and released this beauty on a very small stream where I normally catch brookies. This was a welcome surprise. Great 2016 opener!
  6. My dad has been catching crappies in the southern tc suburbs. I've been unable to find them in the northern suburbs. Found one culvert just packed with 4-inchers that were happy to play, but that doesn't really count. FWIW, his fish have come in really shallow connecting channels in between different bays and/or different lakes.
  7. White sucker on the mississippi
  8. Thanks for the update. Seems like no one is posting fishing reports lately. This is encouraging. You just made it feel more like spring in my world.
  9. Delcecchi is right on. Practice casting (just the line) in your yard. It will shorten the learning curve a ton. My dad taught me in my early teens and I would fish for sunnies in the spring at cleary lake (prior lake area). Any place that is clear of backcast obstructions is good to start. If you want to chase trout with a fly rod, the kinnickinnic is more fly-fishable that most streams in this region. Most streams within a daytrip of the tc metro are narrow, overgrown, and best fished from the bank (not waded), so they aren't very cooperative with less experienced fly fishermen. It's been several years since I've fly fished, but I spooled up this winter and have been yard casting with the same goal. I'll be out to catch panfish later this week.
  10. I've been shut out so far fishing the metro. Nice to see someone finding action.
  11. I was honestly attempting to catch sheephead. I went to spot where I've taken them before on jigs, but they weren't there that day. After an hour of encountering only a few gamefish, I figured it was time to cut it short because I didn't want to run afoul of the law. I try to avoid baitfishing before the open season because I hate to deephook an out-of-season fish, but it can be hard to target roughfish with artificials. Makes for a bit of a catch 22.
  12. This evening, I walked over shingle creek to a spot where I'd seen some baitfish. Made my first attempt at microfishing and failed gloriously. The baitfish were nowhere to be found. I pretty quickly discovered the reason. 2 small pike were sitting in the "holes" where I'd seen the baitfish. There's maybe 10" of water there and I was wholly unprepared to chase pike. I had a size 26 hook on 1lb flourocarbon. Ended up taking my kids to a park on the river and saw some fisherman catch a few walleyes from shore. That kinda snapped my mindset back to more traditional fishing. My boat is starting to look like a good idea.
  13. Tried visiting a few spots on rice creek yesterday and saw no signs of life. Is anyone seeing baitfish or roughfish anywhere yet?
  14. I've caught cats very early near the black dog outlet on the minnesota river in burnsville. The western channel from the lake (before discharging into the river) can become active weeks ahead of the river at large.
  15. Just read a post from a MN guy on a rough fishing page. He's already catching carp and suckers in open water now. Convinced me to go give it a shot. We're well before peak, but the brave get rewarded early.